Table Beer/Soda

Brewing processes and methods. How to brew using extract, partial or all-grain. Tips and tricks.

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Table Beer/Soda

Postby spgriffin » Wed Sep 07, 2011 10:19 am

i thought I posted this, but for some reason I don't see it. Anyway, I am brewing a table beer that should get me around 2% abv. What yeast to use? How long? i the primary? Do I even use a secondary? How long to force carbonate?


Thanks in advance.
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table beer

Postby slothrob » Wed Sep 07, 2011 8:14 pm

Do you mean a Belgian table beer? Like a traditional Saison?
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Table beer

Postby spgriffin » Thu Sep 08, 2011 11:08 am

I am thinking something like a Belgian table beer, but I wouldn't say like a saison since abv of saison is between 5-8.5 -making saison not a table beer. Belgian table is under 4percent.

Anyway, while belgian table is close to what I want, I am also thinking making more American. Still need to know about fermentation time and length and pressure to force carbonate. Thanks for the interest.
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Table Beer

Postby slothrob » Thu Sep 08, 2011 9:34 pm

Traditionally, Saisons were very low gravity table beers, around 2-4%. High gravity Saisons are a recent development.

Historically they were made with very low carbonation, probably close to that of a cask Bitter. That would be determined by the pressure that you force carbonate, not the time. It will still probably take a few days to a week to fully carbonate unless you shake it or try running it at high pressure, which is always risky.

Low gravity beers usually ferment pretty quickly and mature quickly, but it will still probably take near a week to completely finish fermenting and clean up the fermentation byproducts and maybe another week or so to drop clear. If you go with a Belgian Saison Yeast, it might take longer because that is a slow yeast, but that's hard to imagine on such a small beer.

If you are able to get a clean transfer out of your fermenter, there is no real reason you need a secondary.
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